FAQs:  
   

1.  What is Yolohiker.org?
2.  Why did you start Yolohiker.org?
3.  Does it cost anything to go on the hikes or take part in the events?
4.  How can I get involved?
5.  How do you get your photos on the website?
6.  Aren't you getting just a little political in advocating trails and public access?
7.  What is your favorite trail in the area?
8.  What is the best hike for beginners?
9.  Does it cost anything to take part in the Capay Valley Hiking Club hikes?
10.  Can I take my dogs on the hikes?
11.  So, who are you?
 

1.  What is Yolohiker.org?

A:  Yolohiker.org is a project of Tuleyome, a regional non-profit, dedicated to protecting the wild heritage and agricultural heritage of the Northern Inner Coast Range and the Western Sacramento Valley for existing and future generations.  It is a website designed to show people where they can hike in the Putah and Cache Creek watershed, which are within Tuelyome's mission area.  It is also the people.  The biggest part of Yolohiker.org is the people who come on the hikes, help build trails, participate in the events, and support our acivities.

2. Why did you start Yolohiker.org?

A:  The website was created to let others know where they could go within their watershed.  Second, there was no local advocacy group for preservation of the mountains in Yolo County.  The initial verison of the webiste was created by Andrew Fulks, who, with others, went on to found Tuleyome. At that point, the website became one of Tuleyome's projects. We also figured if people were able to get into the mountains, they would be more likely to help protect them and advocate for land acquisition in the mountains.  Lastly, we wanted to let more people know about the Berryessa Peak public lands, which are 9000 acres on Blue Ridge to which the public had no access. Since starting it up, Tuleyome was formed as an advocacy group for this region, and Tuleyome bought the Ireland Ranch, giving docent access to the Berryessa Peak public lands.

3.  Does it cost anything to go on the hikes or take part in the events?

A:  Not usually. Some events might cost something to cover expenses, but most are no cost. But please join Tuleyome! It helps us keep preserving this wonderful region.

4.  How can I get involved?

A:  Sign up for our Google Group.  No spam, just info about hikes, events, and our protection efforts in the watersheds.  Also, you can take your friends on a hike in the area, tell local leaders you want land preservation and public access, and help build trails. Becoming a Tuleyome member is a great way to help fund local protection efforts.. 

5.  How do you get your photos on the website?

A:  I use a variety of digital cameras. I used to scan photos years ago, but now it's all digital.

6.  Aren't you getting just a little political in advocating trails and public access?

A:  Yes. We need to be. If we don't, we will lose public access and those who oppose trails and public access to the mountains will continue to be the only voices heard.

7.  What is your favorite trail in the area?

A:  If I had to choose, it would have to be the Blue Ridge trail.  It was the first trail I hiked in the mountains of Yolo County, and started my love affair with the mountains in the region.

8.  What is the best hike for beginners?

A:  It really is a tie between Frog Pond, Putah Creek, and Cold Canyon.  I would suggest Cold Canyon as a starter.  It has great scenery, a creek, and old homestead ruins.

9.  Does it cost anything to take part in the Capay Valley Hiking Club hikes?

A:  No!  The CVHC is part of Tuleyome's outreach.  The main focus is to get people together to go hiking on the lands featured in Yolohiker.org.  It was started by Sam Bledsoe of Winter Creek Ranch in Brooks.  So, just show up at the meeting places shown on the page, and off we go!  You don't have to be from the Capay Valley to come out.  Hikes are open to anyone from anywhere. To help us pay for our insurance, please become a member of Tuleyome!

10.  Can I take my dogs on the hikes?

A:  Yes!  We love dogs on the hikes and the dogs have as much fun, if not more, than the people.  Dogs are allowed on all BLM public lands, which make up the bulk of the hikes on the site.  Just be sure to check them for ticks afterwards. (both the dogs and people!)

11. Who are you?

A:  Andrew Fulks, Tuleyome board member and one of the founders. I love the outdoors. Don't you?